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2 edition of Effects of the invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle), on survival, growth, and fecundity of native understory perennial herbs in southwestern Ohio forests found in the catalog.

Effects of the invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle), on survival, growth, and fecundity of native understory perennial herbs in southwestern Ohio forests

Kara Ellen Miller

Effects of the invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle), on survival, growth, and fecundity of native understory perennial herbs in southwestern Ohio forests

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  • 2 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Honeysuckles -- Ohio,
  • Forest ecology -- Ohio

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Kara Ellen Miller
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 116 leaves :
    Number of Pages116
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15336991M

    Invasive plants are an economical, political, social, and ecological problem. Some invasive species are a serious concern for society because some of them are diseases, some are agricultural pests, and some become major threats to the ecosystems. Most studies with invasive species are limited because they measure only the impact of the invasion via direct by: 1. Effects of the Invasive Shrub Lonicera maackii and a Generalist Herbivore, White-tailed Deer, on Forest Floor Plant Community Composition. Jessica R. Peebles-Spencer, David Gorchov; Miami University, Oxford, OH. The Role of White-tailed Deer in Long-distance Dispersal of Amur Honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii).


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Effects of the invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle), on survival, growth, and fecundity of native understory perennial herbs in southwestern Ohio forests by Kara Ellen Miller Download PDF EPUB FB2

If the effects of invasive species on certain ecosystem processes, such as litter decomposition, are strongly influenced by their association with native species, this could suggest the need for a more nuanced understanding of the vulnerability of ecosystem processes to invasions of L.

maackii and potentially other invasive by: Asian shrub Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Maxim. (Amur Honeysuckle) has invaded woodlands and marsh edges in 24 of the eastern United States (Trisel and Gorchov, ). In the last few decades, L. maackii has become the most abundant shrub in many southern Ohio forests, replacing what had previously been relatively open understories.

Invasive Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) creates a dense shrub layer in deciduous forests in eastern North America that negatively impacts native herbs and tree seedlings. We predicted that. I* Plant Ecology13 F*. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

Competitive effects of the invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Herder (Caprifoliaceae), on the growth and survival of native tree seedlings David L. Gorchov1-* and Donald E. Trisel1'2.

Despite this protective function of L. maackii shoots, the overall effect of this invasive shrub is increased mortality of native tree seedlings, suggesting it impacts the natural regeneration of secondary by: The effects of deer and an invasive shrub were tested with a 5-year field experiment.

Lonicera maackii reduced cover of graminoids, spring herbs, and vines. Deer reduced cover of trees and shrubs and increased cover of bare ground.

Shrub removal increased species richness Cited by: July Theses Peter A. Frank. Effects of woodlot age on cover of Lonicera maackii, an invasive shrub. Miami University, Botany Department Honors senior (undergraduate) thesis. May Sarah Lawlor.

Using Advanced Land Imager (ALI) for the detection of the invasive shrub Lonicera maackii in southwestern Ohio forests. Ecological effects of invasive Lonicera spp. have been well documented and include diminished native plant richness, abundance, density, fecundity and survival in areas with invasive Lonicera spp.

(Woods ; Gould and Gorchov ; Collier et al. ; File Size: 7MB. Removal of the Invasive Shrub, Lonicera maackii (Amur Honeysuckle), from a Headwater Stream Riparian Zone Shifts Taxonomic and Functional Composition of the Aquatic Biota - Volume 10 Issue 3 - Rachel E. McNeish, M. Eric Benbow, Ryan W.

McEwanCited by: 5. In addition to effects mediated by resource competition, some invasive plants may impact surrounding vegetation by secreting compounds that are directly inhibitory to growth. Lonicera maackii, an invasive Asian shrub of forests and open areas in eastern and midwestern North America, has devastating effects on understory vegetation, some of Cited by: Effects of the related shrub honeysuckle species Lonicera tatarica on herbs and.

tree species in New England forests included a substantial depression of total herbaceous. cover, herb species richness, and density of tree seedlings when cover of the shrub. surpassed 30% (Woods ).Author: Katie Rae Lynch.

D. Gorchov and D. Trisel. Competitive effects of the invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Herder (Caprifoliaceae), on the growth and survival of native tree seedlings.

Plant Ecol – Google ScholarCited by: Individually, the invasive shrub Lonicera maackii and browsing by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have been found to negatively affect the regeneration of native tree species in the.

In addition to effects mediated by resource competition, some invasive plants may impact surrounding vegetation by secreting compounds that are directly inhibitory to growth.

Lonicera maackii, an invasive Asian shrub of forests and open areas in eastern and midwestern North America, has devastating effects on understory vegetation, some of which persist even after this shrub is by: These results demonstrate direct effects of the invasive shrub Lonicera maackii on populations of annuals.

They suggest that other annuals, particularly those that are shade-intolerant or photosynthesize only in the early spring, will decline in the presence of shrubs with early leaf expansion. INTRODUCTIONCited by: Invasive Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) creates a dense shrub layer in eastern deciduous forests that negatively impacts native herbs and tree seedlings.

Given the well-studied influence of habitat structure on spider abundance and guild composition, we examined the effects of this invasive shrub on spiders in forests of southwestern by: 7. Lethal Effects of the Non-native Invasive Shrub Amur Honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) on a Model Aquatic Organism (Hyalella azteca) Honors Thesis Eric B.

Borth Department: Biology Advisor: Ryan W. McEwan, Ph.D. March Abstract The invasive plant Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle) has had a variety of ecological effects as itAuthor: Eric B.

Borth. ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS OF THE INVASIVE SHRUB. LONICERA MAACKII. ARE INFLUENCED BY ASSOCIATIONS WITH NATIVE TREE SPECIES Invasive species are significant drivers of global environmental change, altering the stability and functioning of numerous ecosystems.

The exotic shrub. Lonicera maackii. is an aggressive invader throughout much of the eastern United : Megan Marie Poulette. These results demonstrate direct effects of the invasive shrub Lonicera maackii on populations of annuals.

They suggest that other annuals, particularly those that are shade-intolerant or photosynthesize only in the early spring, will decline in the presence of shrubs with early leaf expansion.

In the Midwestern USA, the exotic shrub Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle) has successfully invaded many riparian habitats, creating near‐monocultures in some locations. This terrestrial invasion has strong potential to modify cross‐system subsidies and impact stream by: 7.

Lonicera maackii is enumerated as an endangered species in Japan. It has escaped from cultivation and naturalized in New Zealand and the eastern United States; in the woodlands of the latter it Family: Caprifoliaceae.

Lonicera maackii is a woody perennial shrub that, at maturity, is typically 6’’ tall, but occasionally taller. The shrubs are upright and deciduous. The shrubs are upright and deciduous. Although deciduous, in Kentucky the bush honeysuckles retain their leaves longer in the fall than native shrubs and leaf out earlier in the spring.

Reduced native plant diversity and abundance has been found to be associated with the presence of L. maackii (Collier, Vankat, and Hughes. Lonicera maackii exhibits direct allelopathic effects on seed germination of several species (Dorning and CipolliniCipollini and Flint ).Cited by: 6.

Allelopathic effects of invasive plants on native flora may be mitigated by the abiotic and biotic environment into which the allelochemicals are released.

Lonicera maackii (Amur honeysuckle), an invasive plant of the eastern deciduous forest, suppresses seed germination in laboratory by: Invasive species are significant drivers of global environmental change, altering the stability and functioning of numerous ecosystems.

The exotic shrub Lonicera maackii is an aggressive invader throughout much of the eastern United States. While much is known about its population and community impacts, little is known about effects on ecosystem : Megan Marie Poulette. Gould AMA, Gorchov DL, Effects of the exotic invasive shrub Lonicera maackii on the survival and fecundity of three species of native annuals.

American Midland Naturalist, (1) Hartman KM, McCarthy BC, Restoration of a forest understory after the removal of an invasive shrub, Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii). Environmental influences on growth and defence responses of the invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii, to simulated and real herbivory in the juvenile stage Deah Lieurance Department of Biological Sciences and Environmental Sciences PhD Program, Wright State University, Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OHUSACited by: Abstract.—Invasive species usurp habitat space at the expense of natives, reducing biodiversity and altering ecosystem function.

The non-native invasive shrub Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) is known to have substantial effects on forest structure and biodiversity in Midwestern North America; however, its influence on nutrient cycling is. Lonicera maackii, an invasive shrub that is becoming abundant in headwater stream riparian areas, deposits substantial quantities of organic matter into the aquatic system.

This organic material has allelopathic effects on terrestrial plants and insects, and a growing body of work suggests strong connections between L. maackii invasion and aquatic by: 4. Leaf and root extracts of the invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii, inhibit seed germination of three herbs with no autotoxic effects.

predators. Some bush honeysuckle species also release chemicals into the soil to inhibit other plant growth, effectively poisoning the soil.

Asian Bush Honeysuckle Lonicera maackii, L. tatarica, L. morrowii, L. X bella Amur, Tartarian, Morrow’s, Belle’s honeysuckle Invasive Plants are a Threat to: • Forests and wetlands • Native plantsFile Size: KB.

Invasive species usurp habitat space at the expense of natives, reducing biodiversity and altering ecosystem function. The non-native invasive shrub Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) is known to have substantial effects on forest structure and biodiversity in Midwestern North America; however, its influence on nutrient cycling is relatively by: Lonicera maackii expands its leaves earlier in the spring and re-tains its leaves later in the fall than native shrubs and trees (D.

Trisel, unpublished data). Such extended leaf display has been shown to increase carbon gain in other invasive Lonicera taxa (i.e., L. 3 bella [Harrington et al. ] and L. japonica [Schierenbeck & Marshall Cited by: vasive shrub, Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Herder (Ca-prifoliaceae), negatively affects the seedling survival and growth of trees native to Ohio, USA.

Lonicera maackii is a novel, invasive colonizer (Davis and Thompson ) as it has been dispersed a long dis-tance.

Lonicera maackii is an invasive shrub in North America for which allelopathic effects toward other plants or herbivores have been suspected.

We characterized the major phenolic metabolites present in methanol extracts of L. maackii leaves. In addition, we examined the effects of methanol–water extracts of L.

maackii leaves on seed germination of a target plant species and on feeding Cited by: Invasive species pose a threat to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems by decreasing biodiversity (Didham et al. Amur bush honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) has typically reduced native plant diversity and altered animal communities by influencing animal abundance and activity (Collier and Vankat ).

This study was intended to determine whether honeysuckle density or other characteristics Author: Katie Rae Lynch. Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Maxim. (Amur honeysuckle) is considered an invasive shrub in forests throughout much of the contiguous United States and has densely invaded the riparian zones surrounding headwater stream systems in much of the American Midwest (Figures 1a and 1c; McNeish et al.

; USDA ). This invasive plant is. Tolerance and defence against herbivory are among the many mechanisms attributed to the success of invasive plants in their novel ranges.

Because tolerance and defence against herbivory differ with the ontogeny of a plant, the effects of herbivore damage on plant fitness vary with ontogenetic stage and are compounded throughout a plant's by: Both overabundant ungulates and invasive shrubs negatively impact forest floor plants, but few studies have investigated their interaction.

We tested for direct effects and interactions of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, and the invasive shrub, Lonicera maackii, on forest floor plant. Invasive shrubs like Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) may benefit from EAB and have negative effects on woody seedlings.

We predict that ash mortality has positive effects on seedling abundance, recruitment, and survival, but that these effects are influenced by L.

maackii basal area and/or cover. We sampled 16 sites, representing a Cited by:. Amur honeysuckle, Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Maxim. (Caprifoliaceae), is a large, upright shrub native to the Russian Far East, China, Korea, and Japan; it was first introduced into the United States in and is currently one of the most problematic invasive shrubs in forests of the eastern United States (Luken and Thieret, ).Additional introductions from Asian populations and accessions Cited by: 3.Amur Honeysuckle Lonicera maackii is naturalized in Texas and other States and is considered an invasive plant in Texas.

Negative: OnColquhoun from Champaign, IL (Zone 5b) wrote: Invasive plain and simple. Personally I would put it at the top of the Federal List of Noxious Weeds. right up there with Kudzu. Negative.A Comparison of the Effects of Lonicera maackii in Areas of Varying Disturbance in and around Oxford, OH.

Authors: Mikey Bishop, Laura Rodgers, Joe H. Sumpter III, Angela Vilkoski Introduction. The purpose of our project is to determine the effect, if any, of invading Lonicera maackii (Bush Honeysuckle) on the diversity of plant life in three areas in varying disturbance levels.